Bend from the hips

By Jeremiah Deesbend from the hips

Every time we exercise we start with hip bending. Our focus is to get our mobility established and this motor pattern dialed before adding load, speed and volume. Start with a very slow hip bend, described below. Move only within the range of motion your body will volunteer. As repetitions increase, you will notice two things happen:

  1. Additional range of motion becomes available all by itself.
  2. The motion is executed with more speed.

This is because your body is adapting to how you’ve decided to generate the movement. More importantly, your mechanics are now congruent with the human design. Your nerves are realizing there is no need for muscular guarding and as these mechanisms relax, your movement becomes more fluid.

How to do it:

  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart.
  • Place your hands on your hips so that you are holding the crests of your pelvis.
  • Take a deep breath into your belly, and then gather your abdomen as you exhale. Maintain this spine-stacked-on-pelvis relationship throughout the movement.
  • Shift your weight backwards, bending only from the hip. Your hip joints will move backwards in space and you should feel your pelvis tilting forward. You should also feel weighted through your heels, with little to no weight on the forward parts of your feet.
  • Keep bending until the backs of your thighs feel tight. There should be no tension in your back. If there is, then you’ve also bent your back.
  • Hang out here for a moment; literally, hang on your hamstrings. You are bending over without bending your knees and directing the majority of the load to the big muscles of your thighs and butt. This is how healthy bending becomes back injury prevention!
  • We are going to take our time getting back upright. Squeeze the muscles in the backs of your thighs and butt. Notice that as they shorten, your hips are levered back forward. Keep squeezing until your hips are underneath your shoulders.

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